Manage Your Freelance Writing Career While Writing What You Love!

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Twitter Widgets
Powered By Vistaprint

Searching for The Ideal Script Coverage/Consulting for Your Screenplay

 

script coverage

Image via 3rentertainment.com

I’m guessing you aren’t already an established screenwriter with industry connections. Maybe you don’t even live in L.A.

I’m also assuming you wrote and edited that screenplay. Maybe you pitched, and nobody bit. Maybe you entered some contests, and your results didn’t earn you the industry attention you were hoping for.

You also don’t have (m)any screenwriter friends who can offer you solid advice. Or maybe you do, but their style and taste are far too different for you to take advantage of this.

You want professional opinion of someone who knows what they’re talking about, but you can’t decide where to begin.

You aren’t alone. I want detailed feedback on my screenplays, but there are many options out there. Offers and prices vary greatly.

So while there are far more services than I can cover in a single blog post, I’m sharing the ones I’m considering using myself.

Now, ideally, you’d want the most honest, detailed, relevant yet encouraing feedback from someone who you could afford.

None of the links in this article are affiliate links. This article exists to make your (and my) quest on finding the ideal coverage service a little easier.

What’s screenplay coverage/consulting exactly, anyway?

Very, very roughly, it’s an evaluation of your script’s strengths and weaknesses. However the length, depth and contents depend from service provider to service provider.

Of course more details and pages usually mean more money. Some even offer marketing packages. Some offer their industry position   (pass/recommend/consider), etc.

Now that we’ve covered that, let’s start with the Blacklist.

The Blacklist

I plan to write a separate entry detailing Blacklist and my experience on it.

But for this article, what you need to know is that Blacklist is a popular screenplay hosting-evaluation site where you can host a single script for 25 dollars a month.

You fill in your logline, keywords, genre and a lot of other information, such as your agent (if you have one), how many episodes you are planning (if it’s a TV show, etc…)

Now, you want your screenplay to be highly visible, and for that it needs a high average score of 8 or upwards after being evaluated by at least two of their readers.

Evaluations cost 50 bucks a screenplay, and they are a page-long descriptions of your strengths and weaknesses, budget (low/high/medium) and a logline written by the reader, and some tips on what to improve .

Those lucky souls who get 8 (over a scale of 10) or above are promoted within the site, and a lot of Blackist favorites have been made into movies. You should remember that 8 needs to be the average of all areas, and you’re graded on the plot, premise, characters…..

The problem is, it is pretty difficult to score that high. Even if your story is strong, this is a highly subjective matter. And getting one or two bad scores shouldn’t put you down.

However with two low/average scores and a couple of months of no/little traffic (more on this on the upcoming post), it might be time to spend money elsewhere and take your project(s) down.

Mind you, this isn’t me being pessimistic. The site’s own guidelines suggest this.

Of course there’s a chance that even if your screenplay hasn’t scored high, the keywords you used to describe your projects can help you get found by industry professionals.

I might try Blacklist again for another project of mine, but for the time being I’m adhering to their advice and will suspend my account for the current ones.

Bluecat Screenplay Contest and Screenplay Consulting

I gave some details about this contest in my previous post The Elusive Craft of Writing Better Screenplay Dialogue & Useful Resources to Improve Yours.

The contest sends your written feedback in a month, and after that you are allowed to resubmit (only once) before a certain deadline, should you choose to make the changes requested. So if you’ve entered earlier, $55 will give you a contest entry, and about a page of written analysis. After that you can resubmit for an extra $40 (or more, depending on when you submitted).

I’ve recently received my feedback, and I’m quite happy about it. Sure, there are elements that made me panic a little. For instance, I was told my characters were prone to saying exactly how they felt (as opposed to hiding it, expressing through actions, or saying the opposite…)

And the thing is, I edited very harshly before submitting it to this competition. The script was at its shortest version, and I had cut a total 7 pages of dialogue and description, following Gordy Hoffman’s (and other respected experts’ advice on dialogue).

That said, this was the first review where I felt the reader and I are on the same page when it comes to what the story is about, why my protagonist is acting in a certain way, and who he is, and how the characters are interacting the way they are interacting.

And I’ve gotten so used to killing darlings (do Stephen King’s ears ring every time writers use this phrase of his?), I’m sure I can kill some more on my next editing spree.

The great thing about the Bluecat site is that there’s lots of great tips on all aspects of screenplay writing. The only cost is your time (and attention, obviously).

You can also choose to join workshops or get script consultation by the Gordy Hoffman (Bluecat Founder and Contest Judge). The downside is, if your script has been evaluated by him, it can’t enter the competiton, which is only fair.

Doug Davidson (Four Star Feedback)

Doug is a freelance writer, screenwriter and Nicholls fellow.

He’s affordable, friendly, and open to questions. He also offers a fixed price/service, so you won’t scratch your head for long. He has posted a sample review on his webpage, and I do like his approach and tone.

His rate is $100, and you get several pages of feedback on what works and what doesn’t.

Happy Writers Stage 32 

My screenplay got to be a quarterfinalist in the Happy Writers at the last competition (before they merged with stage32).

I also love the network of Stage32 (which is also where I met Doug Davidson).

The great thing about Stage32HappyWriters is that it’s free to join. You can connect with other writers and entertainment professionals, learn from your peers as well as more experienced veterans. Helpful posts are frequently published, and there are lots of informative discussions going on.

There are also labs you can attend for a fee.

The good thing about Stage32HappyWriters’ coverage service is that you have several alternatives to choose from. The readers’ credits have been listed, and you can choose a reader whose work you already admire.

Sellingyourscreenplay.com

Ashley Scott Meyers is a working screenwriter with IMDB credits to his name, and he runs a very helpful site loaded with screenwriting tips, including writing better, networking and how to sell your screenplay.

In addition to his free e-mail course (5 emails, an email per week upon signing up) on how to sell your screenplay, the site also features a screenwriting library where you can download actual scripts of movies for free, though mostly they aren’t the shooting scripts. Still, it’s a great resource.

Sellingyourscreenplay.com also offers a premium membership where you can join classes.

As for coverage services, you can choose one of the industry specialists (whose resume highlights are listed) on the page to evaluate your script.

Page Awards

Page Awards organizes a yearly TV script/movie screenplay contest. You can choose to get professional feedback before submitting your screenplay to the contest, or you can do it without entering the contest.

They have several packages to choose from. What I like about their packages is that you can even choose to get a marketing package where they write your synopsis, query letter and logline.

They also have a very nifty newsletter that offers tips, links to resources and several calls for the types of screenplays studios/executives/producers are currently looking for.

Page Awards also lists the accomplishments of their previous winners, and that alone usually fires you up, and want to enter.

I entered one feature screenplay and one TV pilot (drama, one-hour) this year. They are a couple of weeks away from announcing their quarter finalists, so please keep your fingers crossed for me.

Scriptapalooza

Scriptapalooza is respected competition for both TV pilots and screenplays. Like many competitions, you can get your judge’s feedback for an additional fee. You can also just enter the competition, or skip the competition all together and order a consultancy service.

David Trottier

David Trottier is the writer of Screenwriter’s Bible, and also called Dr. Format. His website Keep Writing comes with great articles.

He also offers query evaluation, courses and workshops.

His script consultation comes in different packages ( 14 Point analysis, one sheet or synopsis, first 10 pages…..), and the prices vary greatly.

Specscout

Specscout has a fixed service rate for feature film screenplays (you can’t yet get analysis for TV shows yet.)

Their coverage costs $197, but the price includes the detailed evaluations of 3 professional reader. And should you score a 70 over 100 and higher, you can list your script on the site for free, and forever.

You can also see what scripts have sold, and by whom.

Sample evaluations, along with their scores in every area, can be viewed on the site.

*

Important End Note: 

Remember your favorite movies. Remember your friends’ favorite movies. There have likely been arguments on what’s better, and why. One friend might find your adored “masterpiece” mediocre, and you can question your friends’ sanity/logic/taste for loving the movies they do.

Remember the different kinds of movies that have become box office hits and/or award favorites.

Even if you get a very pessimistic review, or get pessimistic after what you read, you should remember the objectivity of it all.

One person’s genius is another person’s what-the-hell.

So keep writing. Keep editing. Keep studying and pitching.

And please share your results and experiences in the comments if you have tried any of these consulting services.

The Elusive Craft of Writing Better Screenplay Dialogue & Useful Resources to Improve Yours

jack nicholson, a few good men

Famous line from A Few Good Men starring Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson. Written by Aaron Sorkin. Image via whatascript.com

 

Actor/director/screenwriter Ethan Hawke (Before Sunrise series, Training Day, Dead Poets Society) is quoted to have said dialogue writing is easy; you just have to be honest. While I agree with Hawke that honesty is a must, I don’t necessarily think it makes your job a breeze.

You see, I’m honest to the core when I’m writing a screenplay. I try to keep my characters honest too (as long as they are not delusional, dishonest or just plain evil in nature). And this sometimes causes problems. For instance my dilaogue can be viewed as lacking subtext, and my characters being too precise at expressing themselves.

While I appreciate the importance of subtext, especially when it’s needed to create tension and/or mystery, I’m not a big fan of characters being vague, evasive, or sarcastic just because. Is it wrong to have characters that aren’t afraid of speaking their minds, or characters that are just forthright during their emotional outbursts?

Yes, not all people are like that. But not all people (or great characters) are evasive. I just try to do what works for my story. (It’s not to say upon a reviewing of my script I didn’t make add more subtext, I did.)

But while screenwriting has many, many delightful moments, it also has excruciating ones. I’d love to pick Hawke’s brain on how he made his process so smooth, as I mostly love the writing he does.

And since honesty doesn’t do the trick alone, let’s get some more help on how to write terrific dialogue from the articles below:

 

How to Win BlueCat by Gordy Hoffman

Gordy Hoffman, who is a screenwriter/screenwriting consultant and the founder of BlueCat Screenplay Writing competition, offers tips that work not just on a competition level. They also serve as great guidelines to edit/rewrite your entire screenplay.

His tips include getting rid of bad jokes, unnecessary/flowery description, making your script as tight (and as short) as possible, rereading and more.

Gordy Hoffman’s screenwriting credits include Love Liza, an offbeat drama comedy starring Philip Seymour Hoffman.

*Note on BlueCat: BlueCat offers something more than your typical contest: written feedback on every submitted script. And if you get to submit before a certain deadline, you can resubmit your edited screenplay. You need to pay for the resubmission, but it’s still a great way to improve your writing, as well as your chances to win.

You can of course disagree with the comments, and choose not to resubmit.

I’ve entered with a feature drama script, after editing an already edited version. This new version is 7 pages shorter, has more subtext and is much tighter. I’m looking forward to the feedback. We’ll see whether I’ll resubmit afterwards.

 

The Heart and Soul of Screenwriting: Writing Good Dialogue and Description

Also penned by Gordy Hoffman, this article reminds you that you’re writing a screenplay, and not a novel. If you’ve gotten used to killing your darlings in your writing, it’s good news. Because you’ll be killing more darlings than ever.

It also reminds you of the required balance between dialogue and description. You shouldn’t have too much of either. Of course while some screenplays can be exceptions, yours might not necessarily be one of them.

So basically, be coherent and succinct. Give it your best shot. And don’t forget to read the entire article.

 

SCREENWRITING TIPS FROM A SCREENPLAY CONTEST JUDGE

A judge of the BlueCat contest offers tips that will be useful for getting better contest results. But applying these will make your script more marketable.

Yes, it warns you against typos and grammar mistakes, and doesn’t diverge from Hoffman’s views on dialogue and description. But it also offers some great guidelines when it comes to exposition, using your imagination and more.

 

How To Write Screenplay Dialogue by Rob Tobin

Rob Tobin is a script reader, doctor and exec who has gone over thousands of scripts.

I love this article because he believes great dialogue writing is a skill that can be learned and improved. He makes his case through a movie that won the Oscar for Best Screenwriting in 1998: Good Will Hunting.

Written by Matt Damon and Ben Affleck, and directed by Gus Van Sant, Good Will Hunting is a delightful movie experience by itself. However, it is, as pointed out, a great screenplay to study as well.

The characters and their lines are often nothing short of brilliant. And the clip of the scene, most mentioned for masterful dialogue, is available on YouTube.

That scene is one of the most memorable scenes in the movie as the trouble-prone Will (Matt Damon) saves his best friend Chuckie (Ben Affleck) from humiliation, and potential jail time (as Chuckie would have proceeded to kick the pampered ass of the meddling Harvard student) just with his self-read and self-earned wisdom and education. This scores him the phone number of one of the girls Chuckie was trying to impress, the satisfaction of having shoved to one obnoxious character (we also cherish the feeling as the audience), as well as showing an interesting irony: Will can’t get out of trouble himself. Let’s be frank, we often crank out some wise advice, while we can’t or don’t follow it ourselves.

As Tobin suggests, it is crucial to know your characters very well. I’ll leave you with this great quote from the article: 

So you want brilliant dialogue? Make it the only dialogue your character can possibly say given who he or she is, where he or she is, and to whom he or she is saying it.”

Review for Kirsty Stuart’s E-book: How to Start a Travel Blog and Make Money

Some things in life are just amazing and should be experienced, such as:

-       A rocking stadium concert by an artist you adore (and by that I mean you know pretty much all the songs), where you are ideally close enough to the stage so you don’t just watch things from the big screens.

-       Writing at least one story where you pour out your soul. Whether it’s fiction or non-fiction is irrelevant. And since you are a writer, chances are, there’ll be tens of stroy ideas where can you share bits of your soul. Don’t hold it in;)

-       Dancing to one of your favorite songs without caring about anyone or anything else.

-       Finding your favorite spot/city/country.

And probably the most important one for us writers:

-       Making a living writing about a topic you truly enjoy. And most of us love traveling. We just happen to run out of money or time to do it as often as we’d like.

What if we could make enough money travel writing? Whether it’s from your own travel blog(s), writing for others or a combination of these, you can start your travel writing career. But if you feel stuck, or not quite sure where to start, I’ve just the resource for you.

Travel writing is easy – if you are writing for yourself.

It’s writing with the right voice, for the right audience and with the right structure that’s hard. Finding ideas and the right markets for them can be challenging, just like any other writing market.

Finding unique slants can be even more difficult in this niche. After all, it has existed for a long time, and pretty much everything has been covered. Luckily, no one covers anything like you. It does help, however, when you can take advantage of a savvier writer. It makes the climb to success less daunting, and a lot more fun.

 

One of those savvier writers is the lovely Kirsty Stuart, and the recommended resource is her e-book How to Start a Travel Blog and Make Money. This e-book comes with 69 pages featuring:

  • practical tips and experiences from other expert travel bloggers,
  • Kirsty’s own story,
  • how to start and run your travel blog (including which pages you should have and what information each page should contain),
  • examples of thriving travel blogs,
  • how to find ideas,
  • how to find an audience,
  • how to manage and deploy social media for your travel blog,
  • earning money with information products (including tips on how to market them),
  • earning money with affiliate marketing,
  • sponsored posts and paid trips,
  • advertising on your blog (along with pros and cons),
  • how to pitch to publications and other clients,
  • list of some travel writing markets,
  • earning from blogging for others (as well as additional services you can offer),
  • writing an awesome travel post,
  • finding work when you need to,
  • inspirational quotes,
  • tips to kill your fears and feel encouraged.

 

Why I loved the book (besides the awesome content, of course):

  • it’s great for anyone who wants to write full-time about a topic they love, not just travel. The tips can be applied to any niche, but it is a lot more specific if you are interested in travel writing and blogging since she provides so many relevant tips, resources and first-hand experiences.
  • the lifestyle mentioned, and how she came to choose travel writing, is easy to identify with: she calls it the struggle to adapt after you’ve been traveling a long time. I call it post-Erasmus depression. (or blues, if you are having an easier time.This shall be one of my future travel posts!)
  • it’s honest.
  • it’s comprehensive. It fills you in about the effort level from the beginning. And you don’t need to be a beginner blogger to take advantage of it.
  • it’s fun. I’m big on fun.
  • it offers places/ways/markets you can find travel blogging work.

Oh, did I mention the price is £2,99? You can check out Kirsty’s site Freelance Writers Online for more useful tips on freelance writing. And you can check out one of her own travel posts: Must-See Temples in Chiang Mai.

She was also kind enough to answer my questions on travel writing.

Kirsty on writing about politically “hot” countries:

“I personally write travel articles for companies like Viator and Flight Centre, and while I’m sure they wouldn’t want me to cover up any truths, their business is promoting travel! They want people to travel – it’s in their best interests – so for clients like this I don’t really write about political instability or anything of that nature. They’re not news sites so it’s not really relevant.”

Kirsty on whether or not great stories have an expiration date (because what if you had a breath-taking experience years ago and you are only writing about it now?):

I don’t think travel stories have an expiration date, no. Those tremendous experiences and stories need to be told! If there are details that I feel could have changed – the cost of a visa at the land border between Thailand and Cambodia springs to mind – then I’ll just say that. Something like, “It cost $20 USD (at the time of writing)” should cover it. If there’s a good story there, don’t let the passage of time prevent you from telling it.”

 

*

Even though some of the first articles I sold in my freelancing career were travel articles, I had somehow gone into a writer’s block-induced hiatus. But after going over the book for the second time, I made a plan, and made my “returning” travel pitch. It’ll hopefully lead to other ideas and acceptances.

Let me know what you think about traveling, traveling writing and the e-book:)

7 Awesome Resources For Querying Agents About Your Novel

My agent search has begun. So while I have several  posts in progress including (but not limited to):

  •  Review for extremely helpful and fun guide by Kirsty Stuart for making money travel blogging,
  •  Review for another terrific resource for bloggers, The Blogger’s Guide to Freelancing by Ali Luke,
  •  A descriptive piece on steampunk,
  •  Getting attached to fictional characters (and how sometimes writers need to kill off key characters).

But it’s only relevant and timely that I update you on my agent search, as well as the resources – yep, there’ll be some affiliate links- I’m using during the dreaded query and synopsis-writing phase:

Submitting and Formatting Your Manuscript by Chuck Sambuchino

Written by freelance writer/editor Chuck Sambuchino, this Writer’s Digest book guides you on the process of writing, formatting and querying both fiction and non-fiction. You’ll find invaluable tips on querying, cover letters, manuscript pages; as well as samples for anything you will need to write.

In addition to novel writing and submitting, the book includes sections for non-fiction, memoirs, graphic novels, screenplays and more.

2014 Guide to Agents

After having spent two hours and having only completed a detailed list for a handful of agents, I wanted to have a readily compiled book at hand with tips on the querying process as well:

2014 Guide to Agents includes contact details, agent interviews and their genre preferences, query letters agents liked, percentage of new writers vs. established writers, contracts and more.

Yes, I couldn’t recommend this book enough. That said, always check the website of the agency in question and combine the information you find in the book and on the site. Agencies tend to update their needs, so make sure you do your homework well.

For instance, while some agencies preference for romance is not mentioned in the book, you might find they’re especially after romance these days. Yeah, I’m speaking from experienceJ

AGENTQUERY. COM

AgentQuery, by their definition, is an online database of literary agents.

Agent Query is more than just a database, however. It includes information on the industry, including genre descriptions, reasons for needing an agent, other resources for writers and more.

QueryTracker

QueryTracker, by their definition, is a free database of agents and publishers. It’s free to register, and you can use it to track your own queries, hence the appropriateness of the name. The site has been repeatedly named as one of the best sites for writers by Writer’s Digest.

Query Shark

Image via Query Shark blog.

Image via Query Shark blog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literary Agent Janet Reid runs the essential query critique blog Query Shark where she analyzes real queries on what works and what doesn’t. Read her submission guidelines (and the rich well of previously critiqued queries) before querying yourself. There’s a chance she already corrected your mistakes and evaluated your strengths and weaknesses on somebody else’s query.

Writer’s Digest Posts on Agents

Just keep clicking on the related links you come across while reading these. There’s a ton, and it would take me months to generate a complete list here. I’ve,  however, selected a few to get you started:

SUCCESSFUL QUERIES: AGENT ALYSSA REUBEN AND “HIDDEN CITIES” (MEMOIR / TRAVEL)

LITERARY AGENT INTERVIEW: MELISSA FLASHMAN OF TRIDENT MEDIA GROUP, LLC

AGENT ADVICE: SHIRA HOFFMAN OF MCINTOSH & OTIS, INC.

The Write Life Blog Posts:

This is a very insightful and practical resource on all aspects of writing in general.

But when you are looking for an agent, there are some questions you’d like answered to do a better job, including:

-       What does an agent want to see when they google you?

-       What do they want or hate in a query letter?

-        Is it OK to query multiple agents at the same agency?

-       How many queries without answers should be a warning sign for you to improve that query?

 

(*Please note that some of these have been excerpted from the 2014 Guide to Literary Agents, the book recommended earlier in this post.)

How Many Literary Agents Should You Query to have the Best Chance of Success?

Querying Literary Agents: Your Top 9 Questions Answered

What Does a Literary Agent Want to See When They Google You?

13 Ways to Convince a Literary Agent to Represent You

 

Frankly, I was a fan of The Write Life before. But these posts above turned me into an addict.:)

 

*

 

Of course it’s a good idea not to only apply these tips, but take notes of the names of agents that offered them as well. They might be amongst the people you’ll be submitting your work to after all.

Agents information are generally featured on the websites of the literary agencies they work for. However they tend to offer even more about what they want through interviews, tweets and blogs.

So learn what you can about each agent’s preferences before you send that query letter.

 

*

Currently, I’m absorbing and deploying these resources. Please add what you use in the comments.J

And good luck to everyone, whether you need it for inspiration, submission or just selling more.:)

 

Why I’m Forming My Own Thesaurus

thesaurus

Image via: snorgtees.com

Thesauruses are often one of writers’ best friends, especially in times of drafting and editing. You don’t want to be repetitive. You want the word that sounds just right, and sometimes a nice Thesaurus provides you with some nifty words that for some reason elude your mind.

As someone who still has a fondness for paperbacks, I own an Oxford Thesaurus. I also make use of my built-in one that came with my MacBook Air. I occasionally use dictionary.com.

But I recently took up the habit of making a list of most-needed/liked words and phrases. I’ll be reading an article and I’ll see a word that fits the image I have in my head. I underline the stuff I loved in other books/magazines/blogs…Some of them even served as unintentional writing prompts. Ah…the mysterious (and slightly crazy) mind of the writer…

And let’s face it, while there are many ways your character can walk/enter/move/run…etc., only one or two will describe his mood and speed perfectly without contrasting his personality or situation.

Using the right word also eliminates unnecessary adverbs and adjectives. Don’t get me wrong. I might be the in the minority as a writer as I love those parts of speech. Still, some of them are redundant and if you can make your piece smoother, you go ahead and do it.

So there. I’m, with the help the stuff I’m reading and other Thesauruses at hand, forming my own. Because I know what I need. I know what my characters need.

And it makes the process much faster.

What are your go-to resources for the writing process? Have you thought about collecting your favorite vocabulary? 

To conclude, here’s a funny video from Friends on why we shouldn’t overuse anything, thesauruses.:)

P.S. I was also recommended Chambers Dictionary for Mac.

Turn-Offs in Novels: Jargon, Foreign Languages and Detailed Description of Very Minor Characters

I’ve fallen out with a novel I had eagerly bought. I picked it out the ways I always do. I went to one of my favorite bookstores (aka a big store with a decent, varied collection and offering comfy seating and quiet to explore), took 5-10 books whose premise (and genre) I was intrigued by and read a little. I chose the one that appealed to my current reading need: a fun, fast-paced, emotional romance novel. (While I’m also a huge fan of thrillers, I’m working on a romantic/comedy/drama  manuscript myself, it makes more sense to research the market – seeing what sells while getting the escapism I need.)

And it started fine enough. For the first 50/100 pages or so, it was unputdownable. I read it on the bus, on the escalators, before I went to bed… If I wasn’t working (or resting my eyes), I was reading it. Sure, there were some wordy descriptions, a few mentions in a foreign language and some jargon related to the characters’ work. It set the mood. It was sort of relevant. I didn’t mind.

Image via evalblog.com

Image via evalblog.com

But then the characters dropped their foreign language randomly in their sentences regularly. Some characters were from that foreign country so it made sense. Regrettably, it wasn’t one of the languages I sort of spoke. No, they went beyond your typical travel phrases or widely-known vocabulary. Then there was the jargon rain. It kept coming and coming.

Now, the book is aimed more at a female audience. The romantic storyline, a typical female character (I’ll get into the “typical” in my next post) and even the job (decoration-related) probably made the majority of female readers happy. But, you see, when it comes to interior design, I’m more like a  guy than a girl . I don’t have an extended furniture vocabulary . Sure, I love shopping and decorating myself, but I don’t want to know the name/root/history of every single thing. So the book slowed down further. I kept giving breaks and then coming back.

The third turn-off was the detailed description of the more minor characters- characters we run into once or twice as the reader. Yes, I could picture them all vividly, but it took me off from the plots and subplots. Now, there are some things the book did very well. The woven storylines, the setting and the dialogue were pretty good. But I started rolling my eyes way too often, and the initial love and enthusiasm disappeared.

The good news is, the book breaks some rules with novel-writing advice. It’s good news, because it proves you can follow your heart, write your novel your own way and get it published. The bad news is, this book isn’t a debut. So the writer had some leeway. First-timers don’t usually have this luxury.

Now, the point is this post isn’t to critique one particular book (hence the absence of the the title and the name of the author), but to spark a discussion about using other languages, jargon, and the amount of details insignificant characters deserve. Basically, this author hasn’t killed her darlings but has given birth to them over and over and over again.

How do you feel about the use of them? How generous are you with these when it comes to your fiction? As for my musings on “typical“ female character, that’ll be in my next post, so please stay tuned. Until then, you can check out the problem with following advice in this post The Problem With Following Advice, and Writing Your Novel Your Way.

So Everybody Knows How to Write Compelling TV… Or Do They?

intelligence_tv_show

Intelligence starring Josh Holloway and Meghan Ory. Image via metslilled.blogspot.com.tr.

One of the gifts and curses of these blogging, social-media-savvy years is that everyone has got something to say about everything. It’s a gift, because it enables us to share our goals, dreams and writing with a lot more people than we could have imagined. As writers and bloggers, this is priceless.

However it also brings out the worst in some people. The more someone enjoys the anonymity of the Internet, the more likely they are to attack with no holds barred. Anyone who doesn’t enjoy or dislike any point of view is prone to name-calling and all sorts of criticism. And who gets some of the worst of these? Writers.

You should see some of the TV series’ boards on IMDB. The way some people “review” shows, you would think they were all trained pros who have been running the best, most intelligent shows you’ve watched.

Of course you can have an opinion. Of course you can argue. But why does politeness have to be sacrificed? And why is anyone against a certain opinion deemed stupid?

I don’t usually participate except when I see a completely civil board. But I do like to browse for research purposes (I run an entertainment blog) to see how people are reacting to certain shows, events, characters… etc. Anyhow, it is sometimes scary to see how passionately someone loves or hates a show.

Recently, I’ve developed a fondness for the sci-fi/action show Intelligence. It stars Josh Holloway (Sawyer of Lost) and Megan Ory (Red from Once Upon a Time). It’s fast, fun and full of action. It’s sometimes ridiculous, but never in an off-putting way. For me, that only increases the fun. I also love the one-liners numerous watchers seem to despise.

When a show’s concept revolves around a former kick-ass soldier with a computer chip in his brain that enables him to access pretty much anything electronic/online, you know you need a certain level of suspension of disbelief. I have no such problems when it comes to pure entertainment. (Yes,I liked Face/Off too. So what? We can’t always watch movies like The Hunt, which is excellent, but ultimately depressing.)

Now, back to Intelligence. Some claim it’s the worst show of this year. Some declare it the worst show ever. Of course this “accusation” pretty much goes to all the shows…Anyway, a few quite like it the way it is.

I don’t know why people can’t just relax, and let everyone have a good time with their tastes. There are so many shows I can’t stand, but I don’t waste my time crossing my fingers for their cancellation. 

Now, as for why everyone is a writer:

For every show, the number of people cursing the writers is astounding. Many of the writers are regarded as stupid.” A kindergarten kid could do a better job”. Seriously? Then why are all the studios still after great stories? After all, if anyone who claimed they could do better than a show’s writers actually wrote and sold something better, surely all producers would be done looking for the next big thing.

I get that taste varies. I respect that. I don’t shy away from pointing out something I don’t like in a film, book or show. But wishing some parts could be done better is different to claiming, boldly and confidently, that you could have created something much more superior. And even if you could come up with something better, it still doesn’t give you the right to personally insult the writer’s skills.

What do you think about all these aggressive, “closeted” writers? Should they or shouldn’t they chill a bit? How do you react to such aggression when it is thrown upon your way?

When You Can’t Write and It’s Not Writer’s Block

Image via webmd.com.

While writer’s block can be one frustrating ordeal, it’s not that hard to get rid of. I have some great suggestions on inspiration in this post: Finding Article Ideas & Writing About Them: 30 Inspiration Tips for Writers.

But if you are suffering from a physical condition that prevents you from writing, especially if it’s hand/arms-related, I recommend you head to Sophie Lizard’s Be a Freelance Blogger and read my post there. (Yeah, I’m quite psyched about being published there!:))

For more on writing inspiration, you can check out these posts:

To wait for inspiration? Or to chase it? That’s the question.

When Inspiration Is Chasing You, Get Caught! 

My Girlfriend’s Boyfriend’s Writer Ethan: Finding Love, Inspiration & Getting Published

How to Jolt Back To Writing Non-Fiction From Fiction: 13 Tips

The Problem With Following Advice, and Writing Your Novel Your Way

novel writing

Image via bang2write.com

How good are you at following advice? For me, there is no single answer to this question. It depends on where the said advice comes from (reliability), and whether or not it can match my personality traits and some very rooted habits. Meaning I won’t (and can’t) fool myself into thinking I can take the “get up early” tip of some writers, because before 9 o’clock, I’m cranky, useless, sleepy and yes, unproductive. So instead of having a staring contest with the blank sheets or screen, I get up a little later and get the most out of my awake self.

For instance, I adore John Grisham’s legal thrillers and dramas, but the fact that he got up two hours before work (as in before he headed to the law firm) while working on his first novel makes me think he is an (awesome) alien.

I’m sure you can relate. Maybe not to my sleeping habits, but to how I analyze and decide to internalize or chuck tips from successful people. I can work with “be organized”, because that’s sane advice. I might not be able to keep the tidiest house, but I will clean up the mess before I start working.

Where’s this coming from? I’ve been reading about agents and publishing since I started working on my novel, and while some of the tips make me say “Of course!”, some make me scratch my head and get a bit pessimistic. The latest collection of tips that inspired this post can be read here.

(Some of the tips I couldn’t agree more with are about “dream” starts, verbose paragraphs, laundry lists… Please refer to this post for these to make sense )

The good news is, following some viable advice, combined with a good story and hard work, can get you published. Bad news is, it might kill diversity.

I’m working on a romantic/drama comedy which will probably appeal more to women than man on the basis of its genre. Let’s assume I get published (I haven’t started pitching yet,) and a reader picked it up. Here’s what he/she won’t see:

-       A main female character picking all her physical flaws and insecurities apart in several different places.

I read this sensible tip that says no one wants to read about physically perfect characters. They’re boring and/or hard to relate to. I agree.

But when I mentioned the “beauty” of my characters in this story, I referred to how other people perceived them. For instance one character is confident, playful, free-spirited and cute. She has no problem flirting with men, and this is observed by her friends. Maybe she has crooked teeth, or eyes that are too small for her face or she doesn’t like her nose much. Who cares? Her insecurities are irrelevant to her storyline, so I don’t mention them.

Or let’s take my leading male character. He’s described as handsome in a manly and outdoorsy way. He’s also smart, nice and extremely altruistic. So even before my female lead meets him, she is very intrigued. And because she finds his personality sexy too, she is drawn to him. While their chemistry dominates the scene, I don’t talk about if he is too tall or she’s too short or they’re going through a bad hair day. They might not be everybody’s type. They are certainly not perfect, whether physically or personally. No one is. But as far as their looks are concerned, they are perfect according to each other.

-       First person present tense narrative from this main female character.

I love romance and comedy, and I read a lot of fiction with a female leading character, told from her perspective and in present simple. I like this type of narrative. It’s fun, captivating and quite addictive. But the problem is, as I identify with this 20-something, physically-not-perfect but-can-be- quite-alluring-with-the-right-style character who has some problems at work and her romantic life, I keep wondering what the other characters are like. I get how the lead sees them, but I never get to see what they truly think. You can show and not tell as much as you want, but you are still showing one character’s point of view.

I wanted to study from published and well-received romance novels so I could get an idea of how to tell a romantic drama/comedy using past tense, and with an omniscient narrative. I failed to find such books…There are many thrillers and dramas like this, but romantic comedies? Not really. (If you can think of some, please recommend away!)

So I fumbled through my first novel. I tried to use what worked for me as a reader, and what didn’t. I left out what bored me. I tried to produce the type of story that I’d like to read.

I’m not saying it reinvents the wheel. It doesn’t. I’m not saying it’s not unpredictable, or as catchy as the first-person narratives I’m a big fan of.

But this is the story I wanted to tell. I’m open to critiques, rewrites and notes on it. But since there are numerous authors who have been doing this so well for so long, maybe I can find an agent that will take a shot with me, because it’s a bit different.

I realize that some of the advice I don’t apply might work against me. But for the sake of this story being its own (and mine), I have to reject certain tips, and cross fingers that I made the right call.

*

As always, I welcome all your tips, experiences and opinions.

 

Recommended Posts on Fiction Writing

Challenges of Writing Your Novel (After Your First Draft) & Resources to Help You Survive and Thrive

Novel Writing Challenges Get Crazier: From 30 Days to 3 Days!

How to Jolt Back To Writing Non-Fiction From Fiction: 13 Tips

 

How to Save an Hour Every Day by Michael Heppell: Review

A Little on Heppell and His Style

Michael Heppell is quickly becoming one of my favorite non-fiction authors. I’ve also read and loved The Edge and How to Be Brilliant.

His language is fun, catchy and he doesn’t waste words. He knows you don’t have all the time in the world, and appreciates that.

Heppell’s books successfully refute any excuse you might have about improving any area of your life by providing real life examples both from his life, and lives of his clients (he’s a personal development expert that works with companies and individuals) and readers. He also gives examples from real life success stories of people we are familiar with. He renders it impossible to say it’s not in your hands. 

How To Save An Hour Every Day

 

Michael Heppell, how to save an hour everyday

Image via amazon.

How often do you wish every day had more hours? I know I have. Forget 25, I wouldn’t mind 250. But even though we can’t make days longer, we can feel like we have more time by making an hour available for an activity or task of our liking. We can achieve this by managing our time better.

How To Save an Hour Every Day was born out of Heppell’s own need for a good time management resource. However, what was available wasn’t simple, applicable and practical enough. So he delved into his own experiences, tips of his readers and clients, and hence created a book that is fun to read, and possible to apply – regardless of your marital status/lifestyle/job hours….etc.

We can see Heppell’s tips work when we look at his CV, popularity and number of bestsellers. But to get the best idea (and results), I strongly recommend the buying the book, reading it, keeping it as a reference and really applying stuff without trying to cheat.

The book covers:

-       Creating a strong enough why: This chapter explains why you won’t take action unless you feel obligated, and how you can feel obligated.

-       Overcoming procrastination  I don’t need to explain this one. :)

-       To Do or Not To Do, that’s the question: This section covers the problem with to-do lists, a very lucrative idea, priotizing and how to create not-to-do lists. I can’t stress the importance of the not-to-do lists enough.

-       Dealing with distractions: Freelancers and office employees might deal with different distractions, but both have a lot of them. Luckily, Heppell comes up with beneficial tips on how to take care of them.

-       Home: This part is about how to optimize the time we spend at home – and how we (should) spend it  with the people at home. This doesn’t just cover quality family time, but also booking holidays, managing your finances, technology, exercise and more. Needless to say, this is one of my favorite chapters, though I love the book as a whole.

-       Work: This is especially awesome for people with full-time jobs – complete with co-workers and bosses. It features tips on making meetings more efficient, optimizing your working hours and job description,  emails and more. Freelancers can of course apply most of the tips about delegation, meetings, people that take too much off your time…and more.

-       Advanced techniques:  There’re some more concentration-requiring techniques, including using your voice to command technology, increasing your reading speed and more.

-       Twenty-five extra ideas: These are the working ideas contributed by Heppell’s clients and readers. Take what applies, adapt and make them your own.

*

I recommend How to Save An Hour Every Day to everyone who wishes they had more time on their hands, but feels frustrated and stuck about the how.

Procrastination and distractions are universal problems, though as freelancers we probably need to deal with them even more regularly as we are our own bosses, and we are the ones responsible for all our working and free time.

You might think you have heard it all before, though I’m pretty sure you didn’t think of all of what’s suggested here, or at least you haven’t tried all the tips that might work. After all, you still have problems or at least desire improvements in this area, right?

Whatever you need more time for, this book gives you ideas to enable you to lead a more fun, productive and satisfactory life. Oh, and you could probably finish the book in an hour, especially if you’re good at speed reading.:)

 

More Useful Posts on Productivity and Time Management

Procrastination: Friend or Foe?

9 Productive Things Writers Can Do When They Have a Cold

How to Use Our Email Accounts Productively to Avoid Procrastination

Productivity for Writers: Tips to Increase Your Productivity During Hot Weather

 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...